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Herzberg's Motivation-hygiene Theory Applied to Your Channel Sales

Frederick Herzberg developed a theory that job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction may work independently of each other.

Relayware Partner Relationship Management

Herzberg's Motivation-hygiene Theory Applied to Your Channel Sales

By John Benecke, Relayware CFO

In the late 1950s, over the course of more than 200 interviews with engineers and accountants in the Pittsburgh area, psychologist Frederick Herzberg developed a theory that job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction may work independently of each other.

His theory suggested that

  1. Hygiene Factors are things like office environment, salary, status and job security. When they are absent or insufficient, this results in job dissatisfaction but when they exceed a certain level – they do not result satisfaction.
  2. Motivating Factors are things like recognition, responsibility, involvement, alignment and personal growth. These are the things that create satisfaction.

 

So can this theory be applied to your channel program? Are you providing a balance of activities across both the Hygiene Factors and Motivating Factors? An important first step is to eliminate those factors that result in dissatisfaction amongst your channel. Often this means building a great portal. However, a "build it and they will come" portal is a necessary but insufficient step to really drive top performance from your channel.

Generating motivation from your thousands or in some cases hundreds of thousands of individual partners requires insightful, relevant, personal and contextual engagement strategies across their entire lifecycle.

As an example, ask yourself if your Partner System is automating micro-targeted:

  1. Welcome campaigns that are encouraging your partners towards full usage of your portal.
  2. In-Life campaigns that are insight led and aimed at driving incremental revenues through contextual messages prompting behavior change.
  3. Win-Back campaigns that are attempting to re-engage a declining partner status.
  4. Leaver campaigns that leave the door open for future co-operation and protect your end-customers from consequences of the break-up.

Herzberg’s two-factor theory provides a useful framework to segregate and review your channel activities, and point to any imbalances in your activities.

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